NEURO WELLNESS SPA

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER & TMS

There is hope for those suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

NEURO WELLNESS SPA

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER & TMS

There is hope for those suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

WHAT IS BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER?

Approximately six percent of the general population suffers from borderline personality disorder (BPD). The Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DMS-5) describes this complex and serious mental disorder as being characterized by intense emotions that are difficult to regulate, impulsivity that may result in reckless, irresponsible activities, chaotic relationships and often self-injurious behavior. Patients have an impaired self-concept. Mood swings are frequent and drastic, depression is extremely common and suicidal attempts a significant risk. Patients alternate between over involvement and withdrawal, and they are hypersensitive. Intimacy is intense and unstable, and patients struggle with mistrust and feel anxious about real or imagined abandonment. Worry about past experiences as well as future possibilities plague individuals with BPD. Historically, treatment for BPD has been difficult.

WHAT IS BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER?

Approximately six percent of the general population suffers from borderline personality disorder (BPD). The Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DMS-5) describes this complex and serious mental disorder as being characterized by intense emotions that are difficult to regulate, impulsivity that may result in reckless, irresponsible activities, chaotic relationships and often self-injurious behavior. Patients have an impaired self-concept. Mood swings are frequent and drastic, depression is extremely common and suicidal attempts a significant risk. Patients alternate between over involvement and withdrawal, and they are hypersensitive. Intimacy is intense and unstable, and patients struggle with mistrust and feel anxious about real or imagined abandonment. Worry about past experiences as well as future possibilities plague individuals with BPD. Historically, treatment for BPD has been difficult.

TRADITIONAL THERAPY MODALITIES FOR BPD

Traditional therapies include dialectic behavior therapy (cognitive behavior therapy modified specifically for BPD), psychotherapy, and medications. Unfortunately, pharmaceuticals tend to offer short-term relief and must be prescribed with great caution due to the risk of medication overdose due to suicidality.
 
BPD accounts for 10% of psychiatry patient visits and represents 20% of the inpatient population. BPD responds poorly to antidepressants. Further exasperating is the poor response BPD patients have to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which has been a long-standing gold standard for treatment-resistant depression disorders.

TRADITIONAL THERAPY MODALITIES FOR BPD

Traditional therapies include dialectic behavior therapy (cognitive behavior therapy modified specifically for BPD), psychotherapy, and medications. Unfortunately, pharmaceuticals tend to offer short-term relief and must be prescribed with great caution due to the risk of medication overdose due to suicidality.
 
BPD accounts for 10% of psychiatry patient visits and represents 20% of the inpatient population. BPD responds poorly to antidepressants. Further exasperating is the poor response BPD patients have to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), which has been a long-standing gold standard for treatment-resistant depression disorders.

TREATMENT SOLUTIONS FOR BPD

TMS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT

What help can be found for this desperate disorder? Research is revealing more and more that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) could be an alternative treatment option for those suffering from BPD. TMS is a non-medication and non-invasive approach with nearly no side effects. It has been well tolerated in all case studies. Preliminary results from a clinical trial published in 2017 reported, “Our results showed that both stimulation protocols were effective in reducing BPD symptom severity and several symptoms in particular, such as fear of abandonment, impulsivity, emotional instability, and anger. This may have a positive impact on reduction of self-harm and suicidal behavior, as well as improve family and inter-personal relationships through better social functioning.”

HOPE FOR BPD PATIENTS

Approximately 75% of patients with borderline personality disorder have a history of at least one deliberate act of self-harm. More alarming, nearly 10% or patients succeed in their attempts at suicide. This mental illness is tragic, and it is devastating to the patient and his/her loved ones. At present, BPD is one of the most common personality disorders in clinical practice. It’s time to find sustainable relief for BPD patients. Supplemental treatment with TMS can help.

HISTORY OF TMS

TMS received an FDA-indication in 2008 for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. Developed in 1985, research studies continue to unveil numerous benefits TMS can offer. It is used off label (without FDA approval) with great success to treat anxiety, psychosis, post-traumatic stress syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and more.
 

A typical treatment course of TMS consists of an average of 30 treatments spread out over the course of several months. Patients receive 5 treatments per week, tapering off to twice a week as the patient’s symptoms improve. Seated comfortably in a reclining chair, the patient is able to watch television, read, or hold a conversation throughout the entire treatment, which lasts approximately 20 minutes. The electromagnetic coil is placed against the patient’s head and magnetic pulses easily pass through the skull to penetrate brain tissue and inhibit or excite neuron activity, depending on the pulse frequency and the illness targeted. The sensation is usually painless (some patients may experience mild discomfort initially that dissipates as the treatment progresses) and feels like light tapping on the head as pulses are administered. The most common adverse reaction is a headache, which usually is prevented by taking acetaminophen or ibuprofen 30 to 60 minutes prior to treatment.

For more information about the services we offer or whether TMS treatment is covered by your insurance provider, contact us today.

1-877-847-3984