NEURO WELLNESS SPA

OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER & TMS

Can TMS Offer Real Relief for OCD?

NEURO WELLNESS SPA

OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER & TMS

Can TMS Offer Real Relief for OCD?

WHAT IS OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by distressing, intrusive, thoughts and/or repetitive compulsive physical or mental acts that are time-consuming (more than one hour a day) and that cause major distress by impairing work, social, or other important functions. Previously, OCD was categorized among anxiety disorders. However, in 2013, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) released a separate chapter dedicated to OCD and other impulse control disorders including body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding and trichotillomania.

WHAT IS OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by distressing, intrusive, thoughts and/or repetitive compulsive physical or mental acts that are time-consuming (more than one hour a day) and that cause major distress by impairing work, social, or other important functions. Previously, OCD was categorized among anxiety disorders. However, in 2013, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) released a separate chapter dedicated to OCD and other impulse control disorders including body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding and trichotillomania.

OCD STATISTICS

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic condition considered to be one of the ten most disabling disorders by the World Health Organization. It currently affects around 6 million adults each year in the United States alone.
 
One in 40 adults suffer from OCD, as well as 1 in 100 children. It is not unusual for OCD patients to experience other co-morbid, mental health disorders. For example, anxiety, depression, anorexia, and tic disorders often accompany OCD. OCD is not easily diagnosed, and individuals can wait several years before receiving the correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

OCD STATISTICS

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic condition considered to be one of the ten most disabling disorders by the World Health Organization. It currently affects around 6 million adults each year in the United States alone.
 
One in 40 adults suffer from OCD, as well as 1 in 100 children. It is not unusual for OCD patients to experience other co-morbid, mental health disorders. For example, anxiety, depression, anorexia, and tic disorders often accompany OCD. OCD is not easily diagnosed, and individuals can wait several years before receiving the correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

TREATMENTS FOR OCD

CBT & SRIs

There are a variety of treatments for patients with OCD. First line treatment is a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medication, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI). Unfortunately, remission or even near-remission of symptoms is rarely obtained, even with proper treatment.

 

In the past, patients with severe, refractory OCD that did not respond to medication and therapy were faced with only surgical options: cingulotomy neurosurgery (tissue in the brain altered in a very focused manner, referred to as creating a “lesion”) or deep brain stimulation (implanting a device to electrically stimulate the subthalamic nucleus). However, research breakthroughs utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) now offer a non-invasive treatment alternative.

HOW TMS WORKS

TMS uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. TMS gained FDA-indication for the treatment of major depressive disorder in 2008. Since then, science has continued to explore the countless ways TMS can benefit the mental health community. In August, 2018, the FDA added an indication of TMS for the treatment of OCD.

 

During a TMS treatment, a specialized coil is placed on the patient’s head and calibrated to target specific neurocircuitry. TMS cannot be used on patients with metallic objects or implanted stimulator devices in or near the head, including cochlear implants, deep brain stimulators, stents, etc. The most common side effect reported is a headache.

THE FUTURE OF TMS

Success rates for the use of TMS for OCD are significant and promising. It is not only well tolerated by patients, but also boasts long-lasting results extending even a year beyond the treatment period. While there is no cure for OCD at this time, the continued research utilizing TMS and its alteration of neural activity in specific brain regions, molding the brain’s plasticity, is cause for great excitement. Meanwhile, patients can experience relief from symptoms and enjoy an exponentially improved quality of life!

SOURCES

For more information about the services we offer or whether TMS treatment is covered by your insurance provider, contact us today.

1-877-847-3984